Home Health & Fitness How Often you Should take your Cat to the Vet

How Often you Should take your Cat to the Vet

by Harriet Wetton
How Often you Should take your Cat to the Vet

There are so many advantages of having a cat. Not only that they are self-sufficient, but they are also comparatively easy to care for when it comes to your overall health. If you’re admiring and wondering how often you should take your cat to the Vet, follow these facts.

But even if the cats are self-sufficient, you still have to make a strong effort to keep up their medical care.

Cats are naturally robust animals.

It means that many well-meaning cat owners are placing off, forgetting, and even avoiding the Vet every year because their cats are “not sick or injured” or “do not need vaccinations” or are “too difficult to transport.”

Early care

New cat owners usually require an agreement with a shelter or breeder to take their kitten to the Vet shortly after adoption. New cat owners need to learn how often you should take your cat to the Vet and take proper care of cats.

It starts your relationship with your chosen veterinarian and provides an opportunity for the Vet to begin observing and tracking your Cat’s health very early in life.

Vaccinations will begin when your kitten is 6 to 8 weeks old, depending on her lifestyle, family history, and common illnesses where she lives.

Average years

During the first few years (up to about seven years), it’s prescribed you to visit the Vet at least once a year. Your Vet may recommend a different schedule based on your Cat’s risk factors or pre-existing conditions.

Most visits to the Vet will be similar to standard checkups. The Vet will check and clean her teeth, update her vaccinations, and monitor your Cat’s general condition. Cats are especially good at hiding pain, and a vet may be the only one who can help.

Advanced years

Cats older than 7 years old should go to the Vet about twice a year, while cats older than 10 years old may need to go up to three times a year. Cats need regular vaccinations as time goes on, whether indoors or outdoors.

As they age, the Vet will pay special attention to their respiratory and cardiac systems to make sure they are in good condition.

Cat health issue and symptoms

Cats are good at self-maintenance. But even your picky feline can’t stop some of these more common cat disorders and health obstacles.

  1. Vomiting

Vomiting is a common issue in cats with a multitude of causes. They vary from eating something toxic or harmful to diseases, urinary tract disorders or diabetes, and hairballs.

  1. Fleas

Fleas are an external feline health problem, and it’s not difficult to deal with it. Signs that your cat has fleas included:

  • Red or irritated skin
  • Hair loss
  • Skin infections or red spots
  1. Diarrhea

Many things can cause diarrhea in cats, including intestinal parasites, spoiled food, allergies, infections, liver disease, cancer, and more. Symptoms of diarrhea

  • Loose
  • Aqueous
  • Liquid stools
  1. Eye problems

Several things harm the cats’ eyes, such as conjunctivitis, corneal ulcer, cataracts, glaucoma, trauma, viruses, inflammation, and retinal diseases. Some symptoms that may mean your cat has eye issues including

  • Watery eyes
  • Cloudiness
  • Red or white lids, or a visible third eyelid

How often you should take your Cat to the Vet

There are techniques to make the cat visit less stressful and comfortable

  • Ideally, it is best to take your Cat for a car ride as a kitten and accustom him to a carrier
  • Buy a vector that is comfortable for your Cat
  • Take it out, a few days before the visit and make it a safe and fun place filled with treats or toys to help make the trip to the Vet less stressful
  • Once in the office, putting a blanket or towel over the carrier can keep your Cat calm

Conclusion

Most cat owners know that kittens need their vaccinations, and your first visit to the Vet is also a great time to start asking questions about your Cat’s specific needs. Your Cat should be spayed or neutered at about 6 months if she has not already done so through her original adoption agency.

A cat is considered an adult at the age of 1 year. At this point, your Vet should be able to give you more specific instructions on how often to return for a visit.

Establish a good working relationship with your veterinarian because he or she will advise you on how often your specific pet needs checkups. This kind of cooperative relationship will pay off in the long run if your Cat has more severe health problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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